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Thread: RANS Tinting Options for Windscreens and Windows.

  1. #11
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    Exactly JETRep, UV wave lengths can be blocked without tint.
    But I want tinted glass in my future S-21 just for the double cool factor. :) (Not really necessary at latitude 63 though...)

  2. #12
    Premium Member (Donated) scsirob's Avatar
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    In my region there's rules against tinting airplane glass, as it reduces the color effectiveness of position and navigation lights. Is this not the case in the US?

  3. #13
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    scsirob. Ok, thats probably applies to us in Sweden too, despite annex II is national.

  4. #14
    Basic Member Denali's Avatar
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    Matte wrote:

    In my region there's rules against tinting airplane glass, as it reduces the color effectiveness of position and navigation lights. Is this not the case in the US?
    Good point. +1

    I do remember reading that for here in the United States, if planes are to be used at night there is a certain limit to the darkness of the tint that is permitted. How this is checked I do not know. Whether this is checked once upon initial DAR approval for a home built or at the annual if done by an IA or AP (experimentals) I do not know either. I do recall there are limits on tinting. I am hoping a builder or inspector with experience can chime in.

    Sure is a lot I do not know… On the knowledge spectrum, I am more an expert at not knowing and having to ask questions.

    Also on the UV thing:

    If you break the “UV” thing down into the basic three components if UVA, UVB, and UVC with each category basically reflecting different components of the UV spectrum band, it appears that different materials will suffice at providing mitigation. In other words, what sufficiently blocks UVC may not adequately block UVA. Also the thickness of a material such as various types of plexiglass affects just how much various components ( A,B, & C) of the damaging UV radiation is blocked.

    Here is an interesting site from a plexiglass source discussing the UV situation.

    Link: http://www.eplastics.com/plexiglass_...heet_uv_filter



    Plexiglass Acrylic Sheet - UV Filtering
    Ultraviolet plexiglass sheet formulations reduce damaging UV light waves.
    Within the Ultraviolet Spectrum, UVB (short wavelength high frequency) & UVA (long wavelength low frequency) are the two types of UV light that most concern us. Referencing the table below, general purpose acrylic naturally filters all UV light below 345nm (100% UVB), but only 35% of UVA light. Simliarly, ordinary window glass passes about 90% of the light above 350nm, but blocks over 90% of the light below 300nm. Many applications, such as document, artifact, and artwork preservation call for a material which absorbs ultraviolet light in its most damaging range from 285nm to 400nm.




    Also:



    Link: https://www.skincancer.org/prevention/uva-and-uvb

    Excerpts:
    By damaging the skin's cellular DNA, excessive UV radiation produces genetic mutations that can lead to skin cancer. Both the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the World Health Organization have identified UV as a proven human carcinogen. UV radiation is considered the main cause of nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSC), including basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). These cancers strike more than a million and more than 250,000 Americans, respectively, each year. Many experts believe that, especially for fair-skinned people, UV radiation also frequently plays a key role in melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, which kills more than 8,000 Americans each year.
    ….
    UVA:
    UVA, which penetrates the skin more deeply than UVB, has long been known to play a major part in skin aging and wrinkling (photoaging), but until recently scientists believed it did not cause significant damage in areas of the epidermis (outermost skin layer) where most skin cancers occur. Studies over the past two decades, however, show that UVA damages skin cells called keratinocytes in the basal layer of the epidermis, where most skin cancers occur. (Basal and squamous cells are types of keratinocytes.) UVA contributes to and may even initiate the development of skin cancers.
    UVA is the dominant tanning ray, and we now know that tanning, whether outdoors or in a salon, causes cumulative damage over time. A tan results from injury to the skin's DNA; the skin darkens in an imperfect attempt to prevent further DNA damage. These imperfections, or mutations, can lead to skin cancer. salons are 2.5 times more likely to develop squamous cell carcinoma, and 1.5 times more likely to develop basal cell carcinoma. According to recent research, first exposure to tanning beds in youth increases melanoma risk by 75 percent.

    ....
    UVB:
    UVB, the chief cause of skin reddening and sunburn, tends to damage the skin's more superficial epidermal layers. It plays a key role in the development of skin cancer and a contributory role in tanning and photoaging. Its intensity varies by season, location, and time of day. The most significant amount of UVB hits the U.S. between 10 AM and 4 PM from April to October. However, UVB rays can burn and damage your skin year-round, especially at high altitudes and on reflective surfaces such as snow or ice, which bounce back up to 80 percent of the rays so that they hit the skin twice. UVB rays do not significantly penetrate glass.
    So….

    It seems that the type of plexiglass formulation, as well as tinting if necessary, can be used to diminish the amount of damaging UV that passes through a plane’s canopy, windscreen, window, etc. In practical terms, depending on where and how often you fly, all this may just be a tempest in a teapot. As someone said, some folks may just like tinting for other reasons.

    Also, if the existing plexiglass being used in a plane such as a RANS S-21 already blocks out say >95% of the UVA and UVB, then maybe any tinting is justifiable mainly for other reasons, and not for the prime purpose of helping to mitigate UV exposure.

    In any case, plexiglass and tinting options, if available, would be good. If an option for tinting and /or UV mitigation is not available, then I guess it is left to the builder if UV is a concern. I personally would love the option, but given my limited time in the air at the moment, a little sunlight might even provide more benefit than harm re Vitamin D production by the skin.

    I sort of started this thread to talk more about the window tinting because I did not think it was offered as a factory option. I am not here trying to pose as an expert or an advocate for skin cancer prevention. I do welcome all the comments on skin cancer though.

    If UV mitigating plexiglass, via formulation, tinting, or a combination thereof, is available for hardly any more cost to RANS from the manufacturer, maybe it would be a good marketing decision to be able to advertise that their windscreens offer an enhanced degree of UV reduction.

    I guess this is where discussions on forum are helpful. Also, folks who are actual customers of Rans who have ordered an S21 wing kit might have a stronger voice in talking to RANS about topics like this. Maybe they can start think about this as a future option. I am sure right now they have their hands full with Sun-N-Fun 2018 just around the corner.
    " It's Always Something" - Gilda Radner (1946-1989)

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  5. #15
    Basic Member Denali's Avatar
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    Well...I'll be darned... Here is the latest...

    I called the EAA in Wisconsin. Talked to Tim.

    For the USA....No regulations whatsoever. Paint it black if you want. Amazing.

    He did advise using common sense when I mentioned about painting the canopy an opaque black.

    Just passing on what I was told Feb. 14, 2018.

    " It's Always Something" - Gilda Radner (1946-1989)

    " I love Horsepower, but love love love Torque "

    " Nothings says poor workmanship like uneven duct tape "

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